brigwife:

The biggest truth ever to true in the whole history of Doctor Who.

(via nobodys-perfect-professor)

hueva-york:

la-bufadora:

businessinsider:

Infographic: 7 Reasons This Is An Excellent Resume For Someone With No Experience

yoooo what i need by tomorrow

AAAAAHHHHH!!!!!!!!!
THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

hueva-york:

la-bufadora:

businessinsider:

Infographic: 7 Reasons This Is An Excellent Resume For Someone With No Experience

yoooo what i need by tomorrow

AAAAAHHHHH!!!!!!!!!

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

(via shinychickens)

I am FAIRLY CERTAIN I bought this particular copy of Misery used recently because I was disappointed that I didn’t still own it

AND YET it has my high school best friend’s signature on the front page

life is eerie

bigmamag:

Whenever I come across people who say that Gimli/Legolas is a weird pairing because Gimli isn’t cute, I have a mental image of Legolas as Fleur Delacour telling them off. “I am good-looking enough for both of us, I theenk!”

(via 13bannermanroad)

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

dailydot:

Marvel reveals that Sam Wilson will take over as Captain America.

Marvel’s big announcement on last night’s Colbert Report was that Sam Wilson, a.k.a. the Falcon, would be taking up the mantle of Captain America.

Sam Wilson was Marvel’s first African American superhero, and has long been a major player in Captain America comics. He’ll be taking over in issue #25 of the current Captain America, after Steve Rogers loses his supersoldier powers during a fight with a supervillain. Writer Rick Remender explained on Marvel.com that Steve Rogers would still remain a regular character in the series, providing “strategic support” for his replacement.

[READ MORE]

(via hellotailor)

she-kicks-she-throws:

devildyke:

tamorapierce:

xkyaliix:

she-kicks-she-throws:

Photos from 1935 Japan via Old Photos of Japan.

Japanese school girls practicing naginata (薙刀). Naginata is a pole weapon traditionally used by members of the samurai class. It consists of a wooden shaft with a curved blade on the end. In the modern martial art form of naginata, it is carved from one piece of Japanese white oak or it features a replaceable blade constructed from bamboo. Practitioners wear protective armor called bogu (防具). It is very similar to the armor worn by practitioners of kendo. In modern Japan, naginatajutsu is practiced especially by women.

I’m gonna go out on a limb here and tag tamorapierce here because this is just too cool for words. 

And that limb held, `cos here I am, with thanks!

Look at them, at the easy grace with which they wait, at their focus on the weapon and beyond it, the opponent.

Thank you! I sit here in delighted fascination. :3

(via forochel)

gunslingerannie:

"I should be packing," I say as I repaint my nails for the 5th time.

fingalselectronsexparty:

I can only see Chekov as Baby Bester now.

Muppet Babies/Baby Looney Toons fusion with Babylon 5 where everyone is a baby and Kosh is Granny/Nanny?

(via nightstalker1)

vixyish:

bibliothekara:

nevertoomanyspiders:

rileyomalley:

sealprinceling:

cccaptions:

Miss Piggy dazzling for days, cosplayed by Sweets4aSweet

Oh my god

omg shes so cute

SO GREAT EEEE

*dies and is dead*

OMG GORGEOUS AND PERFECT

GREATEST COSPLAY IN ALL OF COSPLAY HISTORY

(via mamasam)

pecancat:

communismkills:

"My pronoun of choice is ‘they.’"

… But you’re one person.

Lmao at the person who doesn’t know that nb people are just a swarm of bees in disguise

(via feels-like-fire)

leupagus:

shakespeareismyjam:

Othello Samira Wiley

DesdemonaSophie Turner

There are captions too, in case you wanted lines. Ugh, I love both of these ladies so much.

And bonus Iago:

Iago

I’D BE COOL WITH IT

(via lordbyronsbloomers)

nedroidcomics:

Summer Draculas 

nedroidcomics:

Summer Draculas 

(via llanval)

chead said: hey what's up with the "!" in fandoms? i.e. "fat!<thing>" just curious thaxxx <3

queensimia:

typette:

nentuaby:

hosekisama:

michaelblume:

molly-ren:

stevita:

molly-ren:

molly-ren:

I have asked this myself in the past and never gotten an answer.

Maybe today will be the day we are both finally enlightened.

woodsgotweird said: man i just jumped on the bandwagon because i am a sheep. i have no idea where it came from and i ask myself this question all the time

Maybe someone made a typo and it just got out of hand?

I kinda feel like panic!at the disco started the whole exclamation point thing and then it caught on around the internet, but maybe they got it from somewhere else, IDK.

The world may never know…

Maybe it’s something mathematical?

I’ve been in fandom since *about* when Panic! formed and the adjective!character thing was already going strong, pretty sure it predates them.

It’s a way of referring to particular variations of (usually) a character — dark!Will, junkie!Sherlock, et cetera. I have suspected for a while that it originated from some archive system that didn’t accommodate spaces in its tags, so to make common interpretations/versions of the characters searchable, people started jamming the words together with an infix.

(Lately I’ve seen people use the ! notation when the suffix isn’t the full name, but is actually the second part of a common fandom portmanteau. This bothers me a lot but it happens, so it’s worth being aware of.)

"Bang paths" (! is called a "bang"when not used for emphasis) were the first addressing scheme for email, before modern automatic routing was set up. If you wanted to write a mail to the Steve here in Engineering, you just wrote "Steve" in the to: field and the computer sent it to the local account named Steve. But if it was Steve over in the physics department you wrote it to phys!Steve; the computer sent it to the "phys" computer, which sent it in turn to the Steve account. To get Steve in the Art department over at NYU, you wrote NYU!art!Steve- your computer sends it to the NYU gateway computer sends it to the "art" computer sends it to the Steve account. Etc. ("Bang"s were just chosen because they were on the keyboard, not too visually noisy, and not used for a huge lot already).

It became pretty standard jargon, as I understand, to disambiguate when writing to other humans. First phys!Steve vs the Steve right next to you, just like you were taking to the machine, then getting looser (as jargon does) to reference, say, bearded!Steve vs bald!Steve.

So I’m guessing alternate character version tags probably came from that.

this has been your daily lesson in Internet History.

The More You Know.

FINALLY. It’s been like a decade, but someone finally tells me what that friggin’ exclamation point means. Thank you, kind stranger.

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